Wednesday, 20 August 2014

Current welfare system 'completely broken' claims IDS

Universal Credit will change people’s lives and replace a welfare system which is ‘completely broken’ and ‘divorced from its founding ideals’ a government minister is expected to say.

Iain Duncan Smith, the Work and Pensions Secretary, is speaking today at a conference in Spain organised by a think tank called the Foundation for Social Studies and Analysis.

Mr Duncan Smith will say: ‘Getting somebody into work can change their lives, not to mention the lives of their children and those in their community. But we had a system of welfare and employment support that encouraged people to do the exact opposite.

‘This was a system that was completely broken, divorced from its founding ideals. William Beveridge, the man widely credited with creating the modern welfare state in the UK, was clear that the welfare system must not be allowed to stifle ‘incentive, opportunity or responsibility’.

‘But by the time we entered Government late last year it was apparent that these values had been perverted - we had a system that punished those who did the right thing while rewarding destructive behaviours.

‘We wanted to introduce reforms that would put work and responsibility back at the heart of system, changing lives not just maintaining them on welfare.

‘Our first step was outlining plans for a Universal Credit - a simple, clear welfare payment designed to replace a whole range of complex benefits and tax credits.

‘Not only is the Universal Credit designed to be much simpler for people to understand, it is also designed to make work pay.’

Mr Duncan Smith is also expected to say that the government was putting pressure on businesses to employ British citizens.

He will also call for ‘tough action’ to be taken to tighten immigration rules to stop a generation of young people ending up on benefits.

‘We have to ensure that our immigration system works in the interests of Britain, enabling us to make a realistic promise to our young school leavers’, he will say.

‘It is part of our contract with the British people. This Government is reforming welfare to make work pay, and to help people back to work.

‘And we are toughening sanctions against those who refuse to take jobs when they are available.

‘But we also need an immigration system that gives the unemployed a level playing field.

‘If we do not get this right then we risk leaving more British citizens out of work, and the most vulnerable group who will be the most affected are young people.

‘In the short term controlling immigration is critical or we will risk losing another generation to dependency and hopelessness.’

Readers' comments (16)

  • Alpha One

    I meant to say IDS did not say jobs for whites!

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  • Did he mention anything about the farming out of jobs from our country by the big corporations to places in the world where labour is cheap, resulting in less jobs to go round here (making us less able to buy goods except on credit), much higher profits for those big corporations who could escape paying taxes here. All this means he should be honest about the future to the young who want jobs: YOU'RE TOO EXPENSIVE, THERE AREN'T ENOUGH JOBS FOR YOU, AND WE WANT THE CORPORATIONS TO KEEP MAKING THE VAST AMOUNT OF MONEY RATHER THAN YOU MINIONS.

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  • Alpha One - its a sweeping generalisation that a Polish man (or any other) sends money back home and not spend it here. Are you now advocating that the government controls on what and where any worker spends their hard-earned money?

    Tell me Enoch, why is it the left that play the race card?

    IDS ignores the reality that I noted in my post above that many British (of white skin or not) people dont want work for more than 20 hours as there is a perverse disincentive to do so due to the clawback of benefit that often sees 65% tax rates and as much as 123% in some circumstances.

    Admittedly thats an historic problem that IDS has inherited (from pre Blair days too) yet he is grandstanding on the slogan that his UC will always see work pay more than benefit. A laudable aim yet his latest use of the immigration and race card is a surefire sign that he knows it cant be done with his UC grand plan. Instead like all politicians, but mostly from the right, he reverts to the race card and claims any opposition to such views must be 'convenient' and evidence of not having a batter argument.

    IDS grand plan that he and his own think tank have spent years working on is a sham when scratched beneath the surface. Lazy politicking and frankly offensive from a Tory politician caught and caught up in the knowing deceit of the HB proposals.

    Whether left or right we need a politician capable of sortign out the problems with the welfare system and not one of highly dubious integrity who plays the race card when all else fails

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  • Chris

    Quite right Jack - but even if every Polish worker sent their pay packet back to Poland it would be a dribble of lost wealth compared to the £Trillions heamoraging out of our nation in share dividends and company profits. Without a reasonable commercial base within the UK that is situated here for tax purposes also the burden on ordinary workers (including those Poles everyone keeps banging on about) grows larger and larger. There is the true deficit and the true cause. The elite have taken the biscuit, now they want the bread as well.

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  • Jono

    Chris, the irony of your position is that ridiculously costly tax and regulations in the UK is what turns off investors from being based here.

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  • Jono - ridiculously costly tax - I agree, if you are talking about someone coming off benefit and paying 65% tax on HB - 30% more in tax than the richest billionaire pays!

    Being in work will always pay more IDS - bring it on!!

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