Friday, 01 August 2014

Annual figures show 10% rise in homelessness

The number of applicants accepted as homeless in England last year shot up 10 per cent from the year before, according to government statistics out today.

Communities and Local Government department figures show there were 53,450 acceptances in the 2012 calendar year – up 10 per cent from 48,510 in 2011.

The number of people accepted as homeless also went up 6 per cent in the final quarter of 2012 compared with the same period of 2011, reaching 13,570.

London showed a huge rise of 22 per cent of households accepted as homeless, going up to 4,210 in the last quarter of 2012 compared to 3,460 in the same quarter the year before. The London figure for the last quarter of 2012 accounted for 31 per cent of the total for England.

The CLG statistics also show there has been an increase in the number of acceptances in the last quarter of 2012 where the reason for homelessness was the ending of an assured shorthold tenancy when compared to the same quarter the year before, from 2,450 to 3,100 households. The proportion of all acceptances due to this reason was 23 per cent compared to 19 per cent in the last quarter of 2011.

There was a decrease by 30 per cent in the number of acceptances where homelessness had occurred because a household had to leave Home Office asylum support accommodation, from 320 to 220 households between the two quarters.

The figures also show the number of households in bed and breakfast rose 26 per cent between the end of December 2011 to the same date last year, from 3,170 to 4,000.

Homelessness charity Shelter’s chief executive Campbell Robb said: ‘This is yet more proof of how families across the country are being pushed to breaking point. 

‘The crippling cost of housing, combined with rising prices, flatlining wages and cuts to housing support, is meaning many families are simply no longer able to hold on to the roof over their heads.’

Readers' comments (3)

  • Sadly, a massively dsproportionate number of these households accepted as homeless and living in unsuitable are from black and ethnic minorities. They continue to be 3 times more likely to be homeless than white households. It is particularly bad in London. However, it is too 'PC' to mention this, so it is conveniently not mention. It is particualrly bad in London. Mainstream agents (and allies) are too scared to mention and challenge the powers-that-be on the year-on-year housing inequality and gross homelessness abuse suffered by ethnic minorities. The continued lack of voice is deafening. In the current harsh economic and political climate, there is no end in sight for the plight of poor, vulnerable communities, of which, ethnic minorities suffer the most.

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  • Is Britain to be the default welfare provider for the rest of the planet?

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  • There are many reasons for homelessness but once again the migration situation is really not helping. Many of those are homeless because you really cannot run a flat on Job Seekers allowance without running into debt. Men over 25 are given no help unless they qualify as vulnerable, surely anyone homeless is vulnerable! Many women come over here and get pregnant, unmarried and get housed (I have seen this first hand because of where I worked). Migrants send money home so not benefitting our country. Divorced men who lose their home then their job end up homeless. MAKE those who own office blocks in this country but are overseas businesses hand them over for accommodation - e.g. Rent free to protect their property from vandalism, maybe short term but would resolve a lot of homeless situations.

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