Monday, 28 July 2014

IH columnist to head council after Green win

Inside Housing columnist Bill Randall is to lead Brighton and Hove council following the elections last week.

The Green Party councillor is expected to be confirmed as council leader on Thursday, after his party won the highest number of seats.

The Greens won 23 seats on the city council, ahead of the Conservatives on 18, and Labour on 13.

Although five seats short of a majority, the Greens will take on the council with a minority leadership rather than opting for a coalition. Brighton and Hove will be the first council to be led by the party.

Last year, Caroline Lucas became the first Green MP after winning her seat in Brighton and Hove in the general election.

Ms Lucas said: ‘This is a fantastic result. I am delighted that the voters of Brighton and Hove have once again made history, by voting in the Greens as the largest party on the council. The fact that we held all our seats and gained 10 – with a total of 23 – shows more than ever the scale of Green support in the city.

‘We have offered people a positive and progressive alternative to the older political parties, and they have welcomed it.’

Readers' comments (7)

  • Progressive Solutions Required

    Well done to Bill - I enjoy your column items.

    I'd be interested on the reason why Brighton votes green when so many other areas do not. Is there something the rest of us are missing, or is it simply a local effect to Brighton?

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  • Apoica

    Bill Randall's columns were actually pretty good. This is an entirely local effect of course. Brighton has the highest LGBT population in the country (with Islington a close second) and of course a lot of trustafarians as prices are pretty much the same as prime Central London. I fully expect to to see the full legalisation of recreational drugs (a worthy libertarian cause I hasten to say) and general dancing in the streets. Well done Bill!

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  • Melvin Bone

    Apoica. Why would you assume that the LGBT population would be Greenies and not a standard cross section of political bloody mindedness?

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  • Progressive Solutions Required

    I think you need to see it from the simplicity of an insect Melvin - either it is food, in which case attack it and/or eat it, or it is one of your kind, in which case it is good and wholesone, to be cherished and praised.

    Sometimes it is hard for more evolved entities to understand how the basic life forms think and operate - but there are books on the subject of primative species.

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  • McMadman

    "Sometimes it is hard for more evolved entities to understand how the basic life forms think and operate - but there are books on the subject of primative species."

    "Primative" indeed. Perhaps you have still some cognitive development to undertake yourself ?

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  • Progressive Solutions Required

    Since when have I claimed how to spell McMadman - but thanks for the indication of error, do feel free to remove the 'a' and replace it with an 'i'.

    Is there a reason that you are defensive of insects?

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  • Were I a social sciences graduate I could probably write a thesis on this subject, and of course the remarks above are all pretty light, however, as a resident of Brighton for 14 years I am still sometimes taken off guard by both its meteorological micro climate and its 'socio-political micro climate'.
    There is an expression in the City of Brighton and Hove, however, that maybe helps a bit, which is 'that's very Brighton, man' (to whcih you may add as many 'bro's', 'dudes' and 'init's' as you may wish.
    I am inclined to agree that we have LGBTs of every political colour, and that is not enough of a reason to explain the local 'Green Revolution'.
    I believe that we have in Brighton a conceit that points to the explosion of cultural events that are inclusive, and yes the LGBT community have contributed to this, including Brighton Pride, which is not really thought of as Brighton Gay Pride, and to which possibly as many 'straight' people and families with kids go as LGBTs. We are in the middle of the Brighton Festival, which began officially 2 days after the local elections, until 30th May. Within that we now have literally 100's of Open Houses in which Art of every description is displayed and sold, with 1,000s of visitors to private homes over the month. The centre of Brighton (Victoria Gdns) is dominated by the huge marquee of the Ladyboys of Bangkok (every pun intended) as it is every year, and again this is by no means an LGBT affair - it is a part of Brighton life.
    Then there are the Lanes (posh eateries & antique-dealers etc) and the North Laine - not so much trustafarian as the real thing where political activists mix with students and arty-tpes, where there is much busking, and a rich all year round culture.
    In short, people visit here for a day or a week, and either never leave or return later to live (as I did).
    Brighton is unique, and maybe it all started with the Regent having naughty parties in the Royal Pavilion when there were only fields and farm animals to witness the frolics. I have been too busy with Brighton's present to investigate it past.
    When we elected the 1st Green MP, Brighton's political diversity was sealed.
    I am extremely happy, am proud to have been instrumental in the safeguarding and the current development of sheltered housing, and expect to see some new models of citizen engagement and empowerment emerge over the next 4 years.

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