Grenfell Tower: the organisations involved in the refurbishment

A list of the organisations involved in refurbishing Grenfell Tower and their roles.

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A list of the organisations involved in refurbishing Grenfell Tower and their roles #ukhousing

Grenfell Tower: the organisations involved in the refurbishment #ukhousing


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The organisations involved in the refurbishment of Grenfell Tower

The organisations involved in the refurbishment of Grenfell Tower

Picture: Jon Enoch

KCTMO: Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management Organisation, the arm’s length management organisation responsible for providing housing management to Grenfell Tower. It was the end client which procured the refurbishment and oversaw it.

Rydon: Main contractor. It won a tender for the ‘design and build’ of the refurbishment project in March 2014, with a contract signed in October. It then held overall responsibility for the work, sub-contracting various elements to more specialist firms.

Celotex: The manufacturer of the RS5000 insulation which formed the majority of the insulation on the tower. The product is made from a combustible plastic called RS5000.

Arconic: A large multinational aluminium company, which manufactured and sold the Reynobond PE 55 cladding panels which were installed on the tower.

RBKC: As well as ultimately owning the tower, the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea provided the ‘building control’ function for the refurbishment. This involved providing a completion certificate which effectively signed off the project as compliant with building regulations.

Studio E: Architect – first engaged by KCTMO as the principal designer for the wider refurbishment, it became a sub-contractor following Rydon’s appointment in 2014, working under the standard RIBA terms of business.

Harley: Specialist sub-contractor for the cladding. It was in contract with Studio E before Rydon was appointed, and then struck an agreement with Rydon for the design of the facade works.

Exova Warringtonfire: Fire engineer. Appointed by KCTMO in mid-2012 to provide a fire strategy for the building as it stood and for the refurbishment work. Three versions of the refurbishment version were produced, the last in November 2013. It provided ongoing advice after this point but was not directly engaged by Rydon.

CEP: The fabricator, responsible for cutting the panels into cassettes. CEP was one of a small number of ‘approved’ fabricators which worked closely with Arconic. Also supplied the window frames.

Max Fordham: The engineering consultant which worked for the TMO providing advice on energy strategy and sustainability. It was Max Fordham that identified Celotex insulation as a product which could meet the target insulation performance and was also thin enough to fit the design dimensions.

Kingspan: Produced and sold a smaller amount of combustible K15 insulation which was used on the tower.

Siderise: Produced and sold the cavity barriers.

Aluglaze: Produced and sold the window panels.

Artelia: The construction, design and management co-ordinator, employer’s agent and quantity surveyor, assisting KCTMO with its management of the contract.

Osborne Berry: The building contractor appointed by Harley to fit the cladding and window systems.

Kevin Lamb: An independently outsourced specialist cladding designer which provided Harley with detailed design drawings.

John Rowan and Partners: The clerk of works reporting to the TMO, responsible for site inspection and monitoring.

SD Plastering: A sub-contractor responsible for fitting the window surrounds.

JS Wright: A mechanical and electrical sub-contractor. It will have little involvement in module one.

Curtins Consulting: A structural engineer reporting first to KCTMO and then to Rydon. They will also have little involvement in module one.

Grenfell Tower Inquiry: phase two timeline

Grenfell Tower Inquiry: phase two timeline

Sir Martin Moore-Bick, the retired judge who chairs the inquiry (picture: Grenfell Tower Inquiry)

The inquiry will be spread across eight modules, with the below timeline set out at the start of the inquiry:

Module one: 27 January to April 2020

Module one will examine the role, acts and omissions of the professionals involved in the refurbishment of the tower from 2012 to its sign-off on 20 July 2016.

Module two: 4 May to mid-June 2020

This section will examine the testing, classification, certification and marketing of key products used in the external wall, particularly the Reynobond PE 55 cladding panels and the polyisocyanurate insulation made by Celotex.

Module three: June to early October 2020

This will involve three topics: first, the complaints made by residents, particularly those relating to fire safety and the quality of the workmanship; second, the compliance with the requirements of the Regulatory Reform Order 2005 by the council, Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management Organisation and the London Fire Brigade; and finally, active and passive safety measures in the tower. Closing statements for all the first three modules will then follow.

Module four: mid-October to mid-November 2020

This module will assess the performance of local and national government in the immediate aftermath of the fire.

Module five: mid-November 2020 to mid-February 2021

The firefighting operation will be reviewed in more detail in this section, including an analysis of training and the suitability of equipment.

Module six: February 2021 to May 2021

This module will turn the lens on central government, with a focus on the responses to previous incidents and
reports, coroners’ recommendations and things of that nature – including in respect of the building regulations and associated guidance, as well as fires and firefighting.

Module seven: May 2021

One week has been set aside for an assessment of the remaining expert evidence.

Module eight: timetable to be announced

This will assess any remaining evidence, including an attempt to establish how each of the deceased met their deaths. The bereaved and survivors have been invited to make submissions about other matters, which should be considered in this module.

Grenfell Tower Inquiry phase two previews

Grenfell Tower Inquiry phase two previews

Picture: Getty

Inside Housing published a series of preview articles ahead of the start of Phase Two of the Grenfell Tower Inquiry on Monday 27 January. You can read them here:

What was known in central government about cladding?

What did officials know about the dangers of fire from combustible cladding, and did they act on the warnings?

Click here to read the full story

The testing and certification of materials

What tests and certificates existed for the materials used in the cladding system on Grenfell Tower, and was the system that provided them fit for purpose?

Click here to read the full story

The decision to install the cladding

Who decided to install polyethylene-cored ACM cladding on Grenfell Tower and why?

Click here to read the full story

The fire doors and windows

What went wrong with the fire doors and window installed at the tower?

Click here to read the full story

The warnings of the local community

What did residents say before the fire and why were they ignored?

Click here to read the full story

 

Over the course of the inquiry, Inside Housing will publish regular news updates on its progress and a weekly round-up of the key evidence and its significance for the social housing sector every Friday afternoon.

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